Friday Feature – Tensed Baby Q&A with Dr. B

Q&A with Dr Christopher Bridgett

MarcieMom (@MarcieMom) met Dr Christopher Bridgett (@ckbridgett) through Twitter – and learnt that he had a special interest of using behavioural interventions to help people with atopic eczema. DrB trained in medicine at Corpus Christi College, Oxford and St Bartholomew’s Hospital, London, then as a psychiatrist in Oxford. He now works in private practice in London. He has co-authored several publications on The Combined Approach, that proposes using habit reversal to stop habitual scratching in atopic eczema. To find out more about behavioural dermatology, click http://www.atopicskindisease.com/articles/PeterNoren to read DrB’s interview with Peter Norén MD, the Swedish dermatologist who created The Combined Approach.

Marcie Mom: Welcome Dr B, today, I’m excited because it’s a question that has puzzled me for a long time. My baby has taken to tensing her stomach and legs in positions such as doing leg raisers or push-ups. My husband and I think it’s related to her being swaddled too much when young (we had to swaddle her due to scratching, sometimes looping a cloth around her limps cos the scratching was so bad). Do you think it is possible that she has learnt to use tensing to ease her itch and will this impact her psychologically? We certainly hope we haven’t made her gone bonkers!

Dr B: No, I do not think so! Probably what your baby is doing is “within normal limits” and is not due to swaddling, or to itching – and will have no psychological significance at all.

Marcie Mom: That’s comforting to know. Here’s another ‘crazy’ question from me. I frequently use finger food like biscuits (but only vitamin fortified, non-sugary, suitable for babies) to distract from my baby from scratching. My husband thinks I’m turning her into a glutton and soon she’ll have compulsive behaviour to keep eating. Is that true? 

Dr B: The importance of neutral/helpful alternative behaviours to scratching is fundamental to habit reversal – the new behaviour should not risk substituting a new problem for the old problem. I do not think what you describe is likely to lead to compulsive behaviour, but using eating as a habit reversal tactic does seem to encourage habitual snacking, and that may not be what you want to do? DrB.

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